Foreshadowing in romeo and juliet act 1 scene 3 5

A fateful chain of events "consequence" does begin its appointed time "date" that night, and that chain of events does terminate the duration "expire the term" of Romeo's life with premature "untimely" death. But, despite his premonitions, Romeo does go into Capulet's house. How seriously does he take himself?

Foreshadowing in romeo and juliet act 1 scene 3 5

The morning is personified because it is described as smiling and the night is personified because it is being described as frowning.

What are some examples of figurative language in Act III, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet ? | eNotes

The acts of smiling In addition to puns and foreshadowing, Shakespeare makes good use of personification throughout his play, as well.

The acts of smiling and frowning are actions performed by people, which makes the example personification. Another example of personification occurs in Act II, Scene 2, the famous balcony scene in which Romeo and Juliet profess their love to each other.

This is also an example of imagery. Romeo is using images of light to describe Juliet.

Act 1, scene 3

Dramatic irony is another literary device used in the play. For example, Lord Capulet has no idea that Juliet has already secretly married Romeo when he arranges her marriage to Paris. Another example of dramatic irony occurs in the famous balcony scene.

When Juliet professes her love to Romeo while standing on her balcony, she has no idea Romeo is hiding below in the garden.

SparkNotes: Romeo and Juliet: Act 1, scene 5

That is why she is so surprised and a bit embarassed when he pops out of the bushes and says he also loves her.A summary of Act 3, scene 5 in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Romeo and Juliet and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Count Paris is a kinsman of Prince Escalus and seeks to marry Juliet.

He is described as handsome, somewhat self-absorbed, and very wealthy.

Foreshadowing in romeo and juliet act 1 scene 3 5

Paris makes his first appearance in Act I, Scene II, where he expresses his wish to make Juliet his wife and the mother of his children. Count Paris is a kinsman of Prince Escalus and seeks to marry Juliet.

Articles Recommended For You

He is described as handsome, somewhat self-absorbed, and very wealthy. Paris makes his first appearance in Act I, Scene II, where he expresses his wish to make Juliet . Analyzing Foreshadowing Romeo: I fear too early; for my mind misgives Of a despised life clos'd in my breast By some vile forfeit of untimely death.

–Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare Read this excerpt from Act I, Scene iv, in which Romeo is talking about going to the Capulets’ party. Then, choose the best answer for each question.5/5(7). In addition to puns and foreshadowing, Shakespeare makes good use of personification throughout his play, as well.

In the beginning of Act II, Scene 3, the Friar, while tending to his herb garden. Navigator: Detailed Summary of Act 1, Scene 4 Page Index: Enter Romeo, Mercutio, Benvolio, with five or six Maskers, Torch-bearers, and others: Mercutio tries to persuade Romeo to dance at Capulet's feast, but Romeo insists that he is too sadly love-lorn to do anything but hold a torch.

17 Romeo and Juliet Love Quotes That Stand the Test of Time